Sports Direct’s Mike Ashley sues former business partner over £3m golf course scheme

Sports Direct’s Mike Ashley sues former business partner over £3m golf course scheme

Mike Ashley, the billionaire owner of Newcastle United, is moving from the pub to the golf course in his latest high court dispute with a former business partner. Ashley claims his former “trusted friend” Tony Jimenez, an executive at Newcastle United under Ashley until 2008, lured him into handing over £3m linked to a fraudulent investment in a French golf course. The Sports Direct boss is seeking £3m-plus interest of about £800,000 in recompense for breach of contract. The lawsuit comes shortly after Ashley successfully fought off a legal claim…

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UK tells Brussels negotiators their Brexit bill sums do not add up

UK tells Brussels negotiators their Brexit bill sums do not add up

The UK has told EU negotiators their sums on the Brexit bill do not add up, as talks on Britain’s separation from the bloc hit deadlock. Tensions boiled over in Brussels as the EU accused Britain of failing to reveal its hand on the financial settlement. UK officials hit back at the EU, saying some claims for money had no legal basis. Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, vented his frustration amid slow progress during the third round of talks, which conclude on Thursday. “To be flexible you need two…

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Alleged mastermind behind bank cyber-attacks extradited to UK

Alleged mastermind behind bank cyber-attacks extradited to UK

The alleged mastermind behind a series of cyber-attacks on Lloyds and Barclays banks that disrupted up to 20 million accounts has been extradited from Germany to face charges in the UK. The British man, Daniel Kaye, 29, is accused of attempting to blackmail the banks after using an infected network of computers known as the Mirai#14 botnet. Over two days from 11 January to 13 January, Lloyds, Halifax and Bank of Scotland were bombarded with millions of fake requests, designed to grind the groups’ systems to a halt in what…

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Why ECB president is still flooding the system with cheap money

Why ECB president is still flooding the system with cheap money

There was little in Mario Draghi’s comments in Germany on Wednesday to indicate that the European Central Bank plans to stop pumping cheap money in to the eurozone anytime soon. Some expected him to use the platform of a speech to a gathering of Nobel economics laureates and students to say that a long period of growth across the 19-member currency bloc warranted a reduction in the ECB’s quantitative easing stimulus programme. It’s more than two years since Draghi announced a €1.1tn bond-buying programme at a rate of €60bn a…

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FTSE falls to 16-week low after North Korea missile test and storm Harvey

FTSE falls to 16-week low after North Korea missile test and storm Harvey

The FTSE 100 tumbled to a 16-week low as investors reacted to North Korea’s latest missile test by dumping shares on the London stock market. Stocks listed in Paris and Frankfurt also fell on Tuesday and the dollar came under pressure, underscoring the flight from equities to safe haven assets, including gold. The index of blue chip companies was down more than 1% before rallying to close at 7,337, down 64 points or 0.9%, following the news that a North Korean ballistic missile had flown over Hokkaido in northern Japan….

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Blackmailer whose plot led to suicide of 17-year-old jailed in Romania

Blackmailer whose plot led to suicide of 17-year-old jailed in Romania

A man who blackmailed a Northern Irish schoolboy who went on to kill himself has been jailed for four years in prison. Iulian Enache, 31, tricked Ronan Hughes into sharing intimate photos of himself and then sent the pictures to the 17-year-old’s friends after the teenager failed to a pay a ransom. Police say the schoolboy was the victim of what they call webcam blackmail where victims are duped into sharing private photos and then told they will be distributed to relatives and friends unless they pay money. Ronan, from…

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Commonwealth Bank faces investigation from banking regulator

Commonwealth Bank faces investigation from banking regulator

The Commonwealth Bank is to be the subject of an Australian Prudential Regulation Authority inquiry, the regulator has said, following a series of issues that prompted concerns about its governance, culture and accountability. On Monday the chairman of Apra, Wayne Byres, said the inquiry by an independent APRA-appointed panel follows damage to the bank’s reputation and public standing by a range of issues, most recently allegations it breached laws to combat money laundering and terrorism funding. “The Australian community’s trust in the banking system has been damaged in recent years,…

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Foreign students bring so much to Britain

Foreign students bring so much to Britain

With reference to your report on the official figures revealing that fewer than 5,000 students a year stay on after their visa expires (PM under fire as student visa myth exposed, 25 August), I have just retired after 17 years as chancellor of Leeds University and cannot credit that the government has got away with this mule-headed and mendacious policy for so long under Theresa May at the Home Office and now at 10 Downing Street. Like many others in parliament and the universities, I have consistently challenged this policy…

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Non-pork meals must be available for school lunch, rules French court

Non-pork meals must be available for school lunch, rules French court

A French court has ruled that schools should provide an alternative to pork school lunches in the interest of Muslim and Jewish children who do not eat the meat. The decision came after a rightwing local authority stopped providing a choice for children. On Monday a Muslim organisation won its legal case against the authority at Chalon-sur-Saône in Burgundy. The court, sitting in Dijon, annulled the town hall’s 2015 decision not to provide an alternative to pork in its school canteens. Chalon-sur-Saône officials said they would appeal against the decision….

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Piece by piece, the case for severing Britain’s ties to Europe is falling apart

Piece by piece, the case for severing Britain’s ties to Europe is falling apart

Those who switched off with a sigh of relief in July may not have noticed. But something big is slowly stirring in the undergrowth of British politics. Fact by fact, announcement by announcement, the case for Britain to remain in the European Union’s single market and customs union is growing stronger and more irresistible by the day. Such an outcome is most definitely not this government’s policy. But, this autumn, something will have to give. Over the past 10 days David Davis’s Brexit department has published seven so-called partnership papers:…

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